Stress: Millennials got it bad (and that ain’t good)

According to the American Psychological Association, millennials are the most stressed-out generation. Not only can stress lead to obesity, depression and heart disease, it also puts people at a higher risk of developing diabetes. Just one more thing for these young professionals to stress about.

 

The good news is that, generally speaking, millennials are highly educated, extremely health conscious and have access to more information than ever before. That puts them in a good position to manage their illness.

Ask millennials and they will tell you they agree. In a survey conducted by global healthcare leader Sanofi, 18- to 34-year olds rated themselves as being more knowledgeable about diabetes than the 35+ crowd.

But here comes the disconnect. They are also less likely than older people to think that diabetes is a serious disease. At least, not the ones living free from this metabolic disorder. For young diabetics, taking insulin seems like the end of the road.

NO CURE FOR DIABETES – BUT IT IS MANAGEABLE

There is no cure for diabetes. At least not right now. However, there have been some exciting new medical breakthroughs. For instance, new diabetes medications that also help reduce the chance of developing a cardiovascular disease. Along with kidney disease and gestational diabetes, cardiovascular disease is one of the main, possibly fatal, complications of diabetes.

But managing diabetes requires constant screening. New digital technologies such as telemedicine make treatment more convenient and less expensive. Allianz Turkey, for example, is launching a pilot project next year that will combine the personal touch with the virtual.

Together with their attending physicians, diabetics will be able to use the specially-developed app to monitor blood sugar levels and other markers. This helps sufferers gain insight into how their eating habits affect blood sugar levels. Another advantage of self-monitoring is that it gives patients a sense of ownership and having more control over their disease.

On the other end of the digital highway, doctors can use the information to tailor treatments to their patients. Ideas like this could be a way to encourage people to stay healthy while keeping their healthcare costs low.

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated annually on November 14. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes.

Telemedicine

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Petra Brandes
Allianz SE
Phone +49 89 3800 18797
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